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Facts about Kosher

Collective Kosher Facts

Here at Collective Purchasing, we believe that all cultures, religions and special dietary requirements are equally as important to the next. We have been investigating Kosher due to a brand new kosher care village opening in 2017, with the help of us.  In Judaism, kosher almost exclusively relates to food: the dos and don’ts in what Jews are and are not allowed to eat. The word kosher is so well known that it’s become part of the common English language, meaning something that’s allowed, legal, or proper.

Check out our random facts about Kosher that you probably haven’t heard of:

In Judaism, for those who keep kosher, observance of the dietary laws is both an opportunity for obedience to God and for preserving Jewish unity and identity.

The word “kosher” is the Anglicized form of the Hebrew kasher, which literally means “good” or “proper,” but came to indicate an item “fit for ritual use.”

Certain animals may not be eaten at all – pigs, camels and hares. Not only are they not to be eaten by Jews, but no products which derive from them are kosher. Animals that chew their cud are kosher such as, cattle, sheep, goats and deer.

Collective Kosher Facts
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Certain procedures must be followed to ensure a humane slaughter. For example, the animal’s throat must be cut by a trained ritual slaughterer (called ashochet), using a single slice of an extremely sharp knife that has no nicks.

Certain parts of animals aren’t kosher, such as the sciatic nerve in the hindquarters. Unfortunately, not only are these parts difficult to remove, they also include some of the choicest cuts, which is why it’s rare to find kosher filet mignon, rump and sirloin steaks, leg of lamb, or London broil.

Seafood is kosher as long as it has fins and scales. Shellfish like lobsters, oysters, shrimp, octopus, clams, and crabs are forbidden. Some fish, like swordfish and sturgeon, have scales that are questionable, so they’re usually considered trayf.

All kosher milk products must derive from kosher animals.

Collective Kosher Facts
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Milk and meat products may not be mixed together. Not only may they not be cooked together, but they may not be served together on the same table and surely not eaten at the same time. After meat meals, one must wait one, three, or six hours – depending on one’s custom – before eating dairy. After dairy consumption, no interval is required before meat may be eaten.

Eggs of kosher birds are permitted as long as they do not contain blood.Therefore, eggs must be individually examined. If a bird kills other animals to get its food, eats meat, or is a dangerous bird, then is not kosher, a predatory bird is unfit to eat,raptors like the eagles, hawks, owls and other hunting birds are not kosher, vultures and other carrion-eating birds are not kosher either.

Collective Kosher Facts
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Fruits from trees planted within the past three years cannot be eaten and in order to be kosher they are subjected to very rigorous checks to ensure that they are free of insects. New grain or bread from new grain must not be eaten either.

Once a vegetable is combined with a dairy or meat product, it becomes dairy or meat respectively.

The prohibition against consuming insects, even very tiny ones — Many vegetables, fruits, nuts, and grains must be checked before cooking or eating for the presence of small insects. Some particularly severe problem vegetables are artichokes, asparagus, brussel sprouts, cauliflower, and leafy vegetables. Washing under running water or soaking in salt water is helpful, but the vegetables must also be inspected under a bright light, either daylight or artificial light. Certain vegetables, such as celery and courgette may be used after they are washed under running water and scrubbed with a vegetable brush.

Collective Kosher Facts
Credit: Flickr

 

For wine to be Kosher Sabbathobservant Jews must supervise and sometimes handle the entire wine making process, from the time the grapes are crushed until the wine is bottled.

Keeping your kitchen Kosher is very important. Meat and dairy must be kept separate and different utensils must be used for different food categories also.

The importance of the laws of kashrut to the Jewish people has been demonstrated in times of persecution, in which Jews have been forced to eat non-kosher foods (usually pork) under penalty of death: many Jews chose to die rather than break kosher.

Not all Jews obey the dietary laws, or “keep kosher”.